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Sep 12, 2013
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Ah, dandruff, the reason why looking over your shoulder was given a different, awkward meaning and why you no longer wear dark-colored shirts.

We're pretty sure you know someone who suffers from itor you yourself have it, ayaw mo lang umamin. Tell that friend/relative/acquaintance of yours that it pays to know a thing or two about their condition, and by that we mean going beyond what those cheesy anti-dandruff shampoo commercials say.

In the second edition of FHM Kadiri FIles we discuss this widespread bane of our scalps, from the reasons behind it to the things you can do to proclaim yourself balakubak-free. Let's start with the basics...


What is dandruff?

                                      


Our scalp is composed of skin cells which, like other kinds of cells, die and are replaced by new ones. This type of shedding is normal and often almost unnoticeable. However, when our body decides to go all Rambo in replacing dead skin cells, small white (sometimes grayish) greasy flakes will appear. That's dandruff.


What causes it?

Believe it or not, this is one of the mysteries of skin health. Despite what some shampoo ads will tell you, there's still no one "official" or exact cause of dandruff. Bummer, we know, especially since, as we've said, it's quite common.

However, oil or sebum (also one of the main ingredients in bacne) is widely believed to be one of its key factors. When a person suffers from irritated and oily skin (a condition known as seborrheic dermatitis), he/she becomes prone to dandruff. Excessive shedding can then be caused by a combination of oil buildup and itching.


Is it infectious?

dandruff causes, tips, preventionHe wants answers, meow

No. So rest assured that if you suddenly have it, it's not because of your friend who's always scratching his noggin. Still, we'd advice against touching someone else's flakes because, well, that's just wrong.


Wait, skin fungi is not the culprit?

As we've said, there's still no exact cause for dandruff. But there's one fungus called Malassezia that has been consistently linked to it. Malassezia is what you could call our skin's resident fungus, but it's normally a harmless happy camper. However, in certain cases, it can grow out of control, feeding on sebum. This can potentially irritate your skin, stimulating the production of new skin cells and shedding the older or dead ones at a rapid rate. The result? Dandruff.

NEXT: What exactly are these flakes?


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