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Apr 8, 2015
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Boracay, Puerto Galera, and Batangas are some of the most famous beach spots in the country. But in an archipelago with 7,107 islands there are so much other unspoiled coasts to see, visit, and explore. And if you're the kind who's just looking to relax, you might not like sharing your summer vacation with so many sando-clad dudes (though the bikini babes don't hurt).

Serenity, isolation, and an opportunity to be "one with nature" (whatever that means), virgin beaches can give you all that. Below are the six the best untouched paradises in the country!


PATAR WHITE BEACH (PANGASINAN)

patarPhoto via Romelee De Luna

Bolinao has several wonderful attractions and if you happen to visit the place, you should aim to see Patar White Beach. Though the sand is not Boracay-grade, you’ll surely fall in love with the crystal clear water and unspoiled surroundings.

How to get there: Ride a bus heading to Bolinao (Victory Liner or Five Star in Cubao). The fare costs around ₱459. It normally takes five to six hours to reach Bolinao from Manila. Alight at Bolinao terminal then rent a tricycle. Ask the driver to take you to Patar White Beach. You'll be there in 30 minutes.


SIBANG COVE (CAGAYAN)

sibangPhoto via Juanchfortheroad.com

A dazzling waterscape, beautiful scenery, and powdery white sand, this remote island doesn’t have any resorts, beach huts or restaurants so it pays to have camping skills.

How to get there: From Manila, you can either take a Victory Liner or Florida Bus going to Cagayan province. From there, you’ll ride a local boat they call lampitaw or the Eagle Ferry. The ride would take another four hours and it could be a little bumpy, but hey, it’s going to be worth it.


NACPAN-CALITANG TWIN BEACH (PALAWAN)

twinPhoto via Lakwatsero.com

You will surely find it hard to get over these generally pristine and untapped twin beaches. Aside from the clear, blue water, the islands also boast of its mountain vistas, palm trees, and fresh air.

How to get there: Until April 14, Philippine Airlines, Tigerair Philippines, Air Asia, and Cebu Pacific will have twelve flights per day heading to Puerto Princesa. Upon arriving there, look for a van for hire going to El Nido. The trip will take five to six hours and will cost you around ₱2,000. At present, only Island Transvoyager Inc. offers direct flights to El Nido.


PUNTOD ISLAND (BOHOL)

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puntodPhoto via Trekearth.com

Got scared of the name? You shouldn’t be. There are no graves here, only a majestic island with a dazzling crescent shape, white sand, and a mini-forest.

How to get there: You can book a flight to Tagbilaran through Philippine Airlines, Tigerair Philippines, Air Asia or Cebu Pacific. Go to the port and ride a pump boat, which costs ₱1,500 (good for 15 persons). It will take a maximum of one hour to reach your destination.


JOMALIG ISLAND (QUEZON)

jomaligPhoto via Gadling.com

Jomalig (pronounced homalig) is located in the easternmost island of Quezon province. Locals call it “Golden Paradise” because of its magnificent golden sand and turquoise water.

How to get there: Ride a bus heading to Lucena either in Cubao or Buendia. It takes around four hours to reach Lucena, with the fare around ₱200. Upon reaching the terminal, ride a bus or a van going to Infanta. It would take another four hours and the fare is around ₱150 to ₱200. Alight at Ungos Port in Real then ride a boat heading to Jomalig.


NAKED ISLAND (SIARGAO)

nakedPhoto via Tripadvisor.com

The beautiful island's name is derived from its lack of the trappings of luxury. All you can find there are blue water and fine white sand. You can dive, snorkel, or swim in its transparent water.

How to get there: Cebu Pacific is the only aircraft that offers a flight to Siargao. It takes around four hours to get to the province. Most hotels and inns have their own boats that you can rent for ₱1,500 to get to Naked Island.

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