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Sep 15, 2016
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Apparently, Nelly ("Hot in Herre," "Dilemma") is head over heels in debt.

The 41-year-old rapper reportedly owes the Missouri Department of Revenue $149,511 (originally $113,533) in unpaid taxes, and was recently hit with $2,412,283 federal tax lien. Such financial woe would send an average Joe into a downward spiral, but it's Nelly we're talking about here, and there had been reports that he is already sorting it out with the government.

Still, ardent fans of the mustachioed hip-hop star decide to offer a helping hand in settling the ridiculous bill, through the hastag, #SaveNelly.

The goal of the campaign, thought of by Spin, is to stream Nelly's 2002 hit "Hot In Herre" between 287,176,547 and 402,880,500 times on Spotify, wherein he will earn between $0.006 and $0.0084 per play.

Not every penny will go straight to the artist, that is why surpassing the 300 million mark is the real target here. And considering Nelly's 11 million fans (on Facebook), those figures aren't too improbable. Especially with already hundreds of thousands of his listeners tweeting in support of the cause.

You wouldn't mind grinding all night to "Hot In Herre," right?

Nelly isn't the only big-name celebrity who found themselves knee-deep in debt. Kanye West announced early this year that he is $53 million in personal debt, despite his net worth of $145 million. He is really better off exhausting his energy on making records than designing weird garb.

R&B star Toni Braxton doesn't seem to learn from past mistakes—after filing for bankruptcy in 1998 being $5 million in debt, that amount rose to $50 million in 2010. Time to lay off the big brands (Tiffany & Co., AT&T, Neiman Marcus) and settle civic resposibility (IRS).

Last year, rapper 50 Cent declared his $32 million debt, accumulated from lavish expenditures, mortgages, and court cases. And doing this sort of thing below isn't helping: 

If you thought the rich and famous are immune to debts, think again.

 

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