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Jan 20, 2014
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Watch out Sherlock Holmes. HBO’s True Detective, an eight-episode private-eye drama series, premiered yesterday, January 19, starring Golden Globe nominee Matthew McConaughey and Academy Award nominee Woody Harrelson. These award-winning actors play the roles of Rust Cohle and Martin Hart respectively—two partner detectives in Louisiana’s Criminal Investigation Division.

Rust Cohle (McConaughey), a former drug-busting narcotics detective from Texas is a loner-type. He likes working alone, and has a very negative, hopeless view on things. Martin Hart (Harrelson) is the opposite. He’s gregarious and an outgoing family man, whose other big challenge is to keep his marriage afloat under stress from his work. What’s keeping them together though is their unshakable demands for justice and truth—even if it means getting violent.

The gritty series is told through a shifting timeline, jumping from 1995 to 2002 to 2012, as the detectives work on a mysterious case that spans three decades. Why it has taken such a long time for a couple known as "true detectives" to uncover the mystery, we'll all just have to watch to find out.

The next chance we'll get to do that is on Sunday, January 28 at 9 p.m. only on HBO and HBO HD. So in the meantime, we'll do what true detectives also do: put these two guys up for a little questioning regarding their roles, the current state of American TV, and pleasing audiences.

On losing weight for his role in the movie Dallas Buyers' Club:

Matthew McConaughey:
It basically turned out to correlate with a lot of different things in human nature. They say if you lose eyesight, you're going to gain in your sense of smell and hearing and other things. The same with the human body—if you lose some muscle and power from your neck down, it's going to recalibrate somewhere else, it's going to balance out somewhere else. And so that was kind of a reminder of how resilient the body is.

On what has changed in TV nowadays:

Woody Harrelson:
I think television is just so good now. I mean, not all of it, obviously, but there is so much good television out there. And I've been watching a lot of it. So I think it does make you a little more open- minded about doing TV. It’s not the same kind of thing it used to be, (where it was) “you shouldn’t do television.”

NEXT: They say never to bring work at home. No one said though that you couldn't bring your home to work. And that's exactly what these two actors did.


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