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This Vaginal Ring Can Prevent The Rising HIV Cases In The Country

Calling the attention of the Department of Health
by Mary Rose A. Hogaza | Feb 29, 2016
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The Department of Health (DOH) recently reported a total of 650 new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the country.

HIV is a virus that gradually attacks the immune system, which is our body's natural defense against illness. Therefore, a person who is infected with HIV finds it harder to fight off diseases and infections.

Of the 650, 27 cases developed into full-blown AIDS and 46 died from it.

A whopping 97.23 percent of the new cases were acquired through sex. Other sources are intravenous drug use and mother-to-child transmission.

The DOH is putting up more hubs that offer free treatment. However, this may not be the most effective solution because some people are too ashamed to reveal they have it.

Enter: the vaginal ring—a plain-looking round silicon doped with an antiretroviral drug called dapivirine. This could serve as a contraceptive for women to keep HIV at bay.  

The ring is part of a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine called "ASPIRE."

The researchers enrolled 2,600 uninfected women ages 18 to 45 from Malawi, South Africa, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. All of the women were considered at high-risk for HIV infection.

Each participant was given either a dapivirine or placebo ring randomly, which was replaced every month. The researchers monitored their health starting 2012.

They found out that the risk of HIV infection was 27 percent lower among women who used the vaginal rings that release drugs. However, for participants aged 25 below, the dapivirine ring did not provide any statistically significant protection because the subjects likely did not wear the ring consistently.

See how it works below:

So how about this, presidential hopefuls: First one who brings this to the country gets our vote!

 

GIF via Giphy.com
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