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A Virtual Tour Of The EDSA People Power Experiential Museum

For those who didn't experience this defining moment in our nation's history, this museum will put things in better perspective
by John Paulo Aguilera | Feb 26, 2016
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One of the highlights of this year's EDSA Revolution 30th Anniversary celebration is the experiential museum set up by the EDSA People Power Commission (EPPC).

Aiming to immerse the public—especially the youth—in the harrowing and the jubilant moments of the bloodless revolution, the EPPC recently put up the gallery at the Grandstand of Camp Aguinaldo in Quezon City. 

From the declaration of Martial Law to the collective sigh of relief of protesters on February 25, 1986, guests are expected to have a better idea of the events that shaped our of democracy at the tour's end.

The experiential museum was originally slated to run from February 25 to 26 only, but the city council of Quezon City confirmed that it is planning to transfer it to a more permanent venue, for the sake of others who want to visit it.

Meanwhile, here are the sights we captured inside when we dropped by the museum earlier today:


The Hall of Restless Sleep

A poignant portrayal of then-President Ferdinand Marcos and Proclamation No. 1081, which put the whole country in an unsettling slumber.


The Hall of Hidden Truths (False Dreams)

Behind a backdrop of impoverishment are the affluent and powerful living the good life—seen through carefully placed peepholes.


The Hall of Orphans

Perhaps the most compelling part of the tour, bawling children in soiled clothes, holding photos of "desaparecidos"—people who are believed to have disappeared under the Marcos regime.

The next room before the next hall is literally covered in photos of Martial Law victims—from political prisoners to desaparecidos. It segues to a labyrinth of more missing persons called...


The Hall of the Lost

The Hall of Pain

The name says it all; torture is one of the more popular themes during the dark days of Martial Law and, in disturbing fashion, such methods are presented in the form of a game show. The winner? The oppressor who plays the game master.


The Hall of Forgotten Martyrs

Four unheralded individuals (Atenean and National Union of Students president Edgar Jopson; MAKIBAKA founder Lorena Barros; Kalinga Macli-ing Dulag; and Antique Governor Evelino Javier) shed light on their respective contributions during the troubled era through theater.


The Hall of Awakening

People Power anthem "Bayan Ko" and cries for change drown this part of the tour, which symbolizes the Filipinos' undying hope for a better future through the restoration of democracy.


The Hall of Reality

Images from the peaceful revolt cover the room, inviting contemplation aside from mere visual appreciation. A tower made up of yellow ribbons and paper flowers stand tall in the midst of it all.

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The Hall of Action

At the end of the tour, two people call for action: Jose Rizal and Pres. Noynoy Aquino. Are you one to grasp their words on this monumental episode of Philippine history?

 

Photography Majoy Siason