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Sep 30, 2010
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Mad Men is the sole surviving series among a pool of advertising dramas that went off the air as soon as you can say “advertising.”

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And for that alone, our initial take on Mad Men was that the show must have something really clever going on.

Now on its fourth season, we’re way past our assumptions; the show is really good.

Mad Men is set in New York City, where renowned advertising agency Sterling Cooper built its grounds on Madison Avenue in the 1960s.

The changing moods, the once ethical gestures, and political incorrectness of 1960s America comprise the show’s plot.

Jon Hamm plays Don Draper, the agency’s long-time creative director and the series’ lead. He is the consummate 60s icon: a successful sharp dressing adman notorious for his womanizing and creativity.

Heck, a man of such stature is still pretty much the dream to this day. The flip side of things however, sees Don as a family man with a dark past. He is joined by fellow admen Pete Campbell (Vincent Kartheiser) and Roger Sterling (John Slattery).

Mad Men doesn’t fall short on its share of watch-worthy women with blondes and redheads alike made sexier by their demure appearance.

January Jones plays Betty Draper, Don’s wife and a young mother of three. Quite the mom shell, this lady has become – Betty is a pretty face who’s capable of garnering flatteries from other men every once in a while.

Christina Hendricks (who plays Joan Holloway) is also a pleasant surprise, courtesy of this chic’s curvy figure and the seductive sensation she exudes around men. The 1960s can only help to her already-kinky aura.

Mad Men is also getting props for its genuine attention to details – the clothing, culture, language, even the office space is committed to the 60s era. Don Draper in fact has been voted number 1 in AskMen’s list of the most influential men in 2009.

This genius of a show manages to go beyond their niche market with sharp storylines and realistic nail-biters. Mad Men has the distinct quality of making its audience look good just by watching the show alone.

A Golden Globe and Emmy award pretty much says it all: all four seasons of the series has been critically acclaimed, prompting us to want the series to expand into a 24-episode season.



Mad Men airs Thursdays and Saturdays on 2nd Avenue.

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WORDS BY MIKEY AGULTO

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