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Interview: Khyne L. Palumar
Photography: Alfred Mendoza

You've done a lot of videos. As an artist, which probably translates to birthing babies. Do you favor one child over the other?
There's always this soft spot for the first video that I did, a very independent production for Ciudad called "The Herb," which didn't really get a lot of airplay, but until now, even if it was a low-tech shoot, it's still one of my favorites. Usually every new one becomes a favorite. There are some that until now I still like, like Urbandub's "Frailty," which was the first video I did with an actual budget.

Is there an artist or band that you wouldn't be caught dead working with?
Uhm, this is an interview, and it will come out in a magazine, so-no. I love all the bands. Ha ha ha! The problem now is not actually the band but the budget for the music video. Budget for music videos has gone down since last year. I've yet to meet a director who turns to music videos as a direct source of income; we do it as a creative outlet or passion project. If I like the song and I like the artist, then usually I do it.

Since it’s a question of passion and not making money, would you say that you’d be willing to overstep certain boundaries and venture into, say, R-rated music videos?
Hmm…well, all my videos are relatively PG, except for some violence. But we did shoot a video with two girls kissing, which eventually got censored. It was a video for Maryzark, an alternative band. We had to re-edit it so you don’t see the girls kissing. It’s hard to do a sexy music video here in the Philippines; I think people get away more with violence than with sex. But I think music videos in general are supposed to be experimental, so there shouldn’t be a line that shouldn’t be crossed. In fact, I think every music video should cross one line or another to be different or to be memorable.

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