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Aug 19, 2010
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Back in the heyday of arcade gaming, one of the most popular genres was the 2D side-scrolling beat-em-up. [firstpara]
A few examples include classics like Golden Axe, Double Dragon, Final Fight and series-based goodies like X-Men, Alien Vs. Predator, The Simpsons, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

If you were a kid growing up in the late 80s to the mid-90s, and were the type who bugged their moms for token money when at the mall, then you know exactly what we’re talking about.

If not, well then, allow Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World: The Game to give you a lesson on why beating up random bad guys who gang up on you as you steadily move from left to right is still such a darn good time.

Available on the PS3’s Playstation Store and on the Xbox 360’s Xbox Live Arcade, this downloadable game is a striking tribute to a videogame genre long since forgotten in this era of Halo, and motion-controlled games.

Based on a graphic novel by Bryan Lee O’ Malley, (which is now a movie starring that dude from Superbad Michael Cera) the game stars four of the series’ characters including Scott Pilgrim, Ramona Flowers, Kim Pine or Stephen Stills, with each character having his/her own moveset.

You can choose which character you want to use, the same way that old Simpson arcade game let you choose between Homer, Marge, Lisa and Bart to rescue a kidnapped Maggie. In Scott Pilgrim’s case though, the ultimate goal is to defeat the seven evil exes of Ramona, who is Scott’s girlfriend.

As is beat-em-up tradition, the game lets you play cooperatively with 3 other players to finish the adventure. The action is simple yet frenetic, and in the beginning it usually boils down to whoever can mash the buttons the fastest to punch, kick, or carry and throw opponents in the way of harm. The wave of enemies is relentless, so trust us when we say that your fingers are really going to be busy.

With a colorful art style and a soundtrack that mimics the style of 8-bit and 16-bit era videogames, the game really does a good job of inducing nostalgia. The presentation transforms what could have been a repetitive button-mashing game into something that you’ll want to finish through and through.

As you progress into the game, the difficulty will mosdef spike up. This is where you’ll see some of the more modern bits of Scott Pilgrim;  the game incorporates an RPG-lite character development system.

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Unlike the games on which Scott Pilgrim is based,  your character here levels up from beating opponents that earn you new fighting moves. These will be invaluable to the later stages. Money is earned in the same manner; use it to purchase food and apparel that boost your stats.

At times, the stages will become really hard especially if you’re not playing with other players, and will require a little bit of level grinding to increase your stats.

It’s all worth it though to see this game through the end, because only when you finish the game will you realize that they really don’t make games the way they used to anymore.

This one’s a must own for gamers who miss all those old school arcade brawlers, and at just $10 (Around P500), it’s a sweet way to keep those itchy gamer fingers satisfied until the big releases of fall come our way.


WORDS BY: GELO GONZALES

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