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Aug 18, 2015
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With traffic in our beloved country worsening each and every day, it has become obvious that more and more people are now opting to go with two wheels.

While bicycle-riding have yet to become a primary mode of transport—due to congested bike lanes and reckless motorists—the idea of bikes swarming the metro, if you think about it, isn't really far-fetched, considering how people have come to dread commuting.

But what if that time finally comes, but you've (sadly) already put on the years and realize that you are not quite cut out for it?

Before you get discouraged, we'd like you to meet Roberto Querimit, 65, and Sergio Dueñas, 61, two military vets who not just bike to work but literally have cycling as their passion and their job. These dudes have been competing—and bringing home the bacon—in the local cycling scene since they were teens even up to now when they are already very much qualified for senior citizen cards.

Querimit and Dueñas, along with Ronda Pilipinas moto commissaire and team leader Oliver Nebres, are currently on a epic cross-country ride, aiming to cover an astounding 5,000 kilometers in just 50 days. Backed by Mars Kingdom and Phil-Bike Convention, Inc., the trio will pedal their way to various spots in Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao to promote local bike tourism.

But before they left, FHM had a chat with the two seasoned cyclists wherein they imparted words of wisdom on how they were able to sustain their high level of bike activity and vigor through the years.

Read on to know how to remain biking even if you're already 60 (and beyond)!


KEEP BIKING

For starters, Dueñas and Querimit hasn't let up with cycling DAILY, going for 50 to 60 km, sometimes even 70 when they become completely absorbed. "'Pag 50, parang balewala lang sa'min eh... Ang average ko sa takbo 40 to 35 (kilometers)," Querimit shares.

And if you thought with age comes less training, you're quite mistaken. "'Pag mas matanda, medyo doble nga ang ensayo namin eh... para maging fit (pa rin) 'yung katawan," explains Querimit, who still races with and even manages to outrun cyclists one-third of his age.

What's your excuse?

Philippine Navy retiree Roberto Querimit


DO YOUR DIET RIGHT

A hardcore cyclist's diet mainly consists of fruits and vegetables—particularly bananas and watermelon—with a serving of fish and a carton of milk for protein intake. These folks hardly eat pork and/or chicken meat.

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And "hindi pwedeng busog na busog," Querimit points out, adding that he doesn't even eat before he sets off to his daily ride. Also, don't forget the vitamins.


NO ROOM FOR SLEEP DEPRIVATION

Querimit hits the sack at around 8:30 p.m. and wakes up 5 a.m. for his morning drive. Though Querimit warns of a sunrise ride, "Alerto ka sa umaga, marami kasing lasing."

The three riders were consistent in emphasizing the importance of getting not just enough but proper sleep, as lethargy easily leads to underperformance.

Philippine Army veteran Sergio Dueñas, Jr.


DISCIPLINE!

It is likely for sportsmen, especially those with age, to steer cleer of vices, particularly cigarettes and booze, but that doesn't mean that these men can't have a good time. Dueñas recognizes that the body needs alcohol, albeit managed, saying, "Kahit nasa MOA kami, pag naisipan namin, isang beer (laughs), ganun ang kasiyahan namin."

Although unlike most social drinkers, he admits that it's easier for him to get that bitter liquid out of his system, thanks to a few kilometers of biking (read: sweating out the alcohol).


CHECK BEFORE YOU MOUNT

Another consideration if you want to bike even if you're Dueñas and Querimit's age is safety and security while riding. Pre-ride gear check and stretching are as important as cooling down after a day's journey, Dueñas reminds.


Follow the team’s journey across the archipelago By liking MK Bike Tour PH or PhilBike Expo on Facebook and Twitter, and @philbikeexpo1 on Instagram.

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