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Nov 9, 2016
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Through the years, smartphones just keep on getting better. Tech giants such as Apple and Samsung have found ways to add more features on mobile phones to continuously improve a handset's capabilities. However, there is still one thing that manufacturers can't seem to get right: the battery

No matter how many upgrades a certain phone model receives, the battery life doesn't seem to be enough.  

Luckily, our constant search for solutions to have led some researchers to discover an answer to all our battery-charging woes. 

Scientists from the University of Michigan and Cornell have come up with a material called the magnetoelectric multiferroic, which only requires a few blasts of energy to function properly. Regular batteries and power sources need a constant stream of electricity, which is why we need to charge our devices for long periods of time. With this new material, our future devices wouldn't need constant and lengthy charging and would be able to function using 100 times less energy.

Basically, the published study states that the magnetoelectric multiferroic functions by sandwiching layers of atomic substances to make a "magnetically polar film" that can switch from negative to positive when blasted with tiny pulses of electricity.

 

Think of the polar film as a bank that stocks up on electricity to be used for energy consumption. It activates when needed and deactivates when you're not using it. 

Another unique ability of this material is its capabiltiy to send and receive codes that make computers and other electronic devices, such as mobile phones, function more efficiently. This means that our devices will be capable of reading and writing data using just a small bit of power. Tasks such as browsing the internet or downloading apps won't require that much energy. The best part is that a single full charge of your device is equal to three months of battery power. 

Still, researchers claim that we're far from seeing this type of material being used in our phones but it's a good start. 

At least we're a lot closer to bidding our lithium-ion batteries and powerbanks goodbye. 

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