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Apr 1, 2016
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It seems like former Interior secretary Mar Roxas is not the only politician who thought of creating a comic book depicting his “heroic” acts. Senator Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. has one of his own.

In fact, Marcos’ comic book was published when he filed his certificate of candidacy as vice president last year, pre-empting the Roxas campaign team's idea.

The 20-page comic book features the life of Marcos—from his birth to his younger years and to his eventual rise as a senator.

Naturally the protagonist in his own comic book, Marcos is portrayed here as a smart kid who cares for the welfare of his fellow men.

It also tries to show how the senator's youth was just like any normal kid’s despite the comparisons being nothing close to an average Filipino’s life. A few pages show the young Marcos “braving the cold” by a fireplace inside a house, learning how to cook in a well-equipped kitchen by himself and without a yaya's help. He's is so driven in fact to prove his worth that he's even seen scoring an apparent touchdown, leading his football team to a championship.

Their family’s expulsion from the Malacañan was also depicted in the comics, detailing how US soldiers apparently abused them on their way to Hawaii after the People Power Revolution in 1986 had forced the Marcoses to go into exile.

Due to this, Marcos resolved to return to the Philippines using a fake passport and identity so he could be like his dad, the late president Ferdinand E. Marcos, and be of service to the Filipinos.

Although failing in his first bid for a senatorial seat, he won as governor of Ilocos Norte in 1998, and eventually was elected as senator in 2010.

However, there was no mention of the brutal Martial Law years throughout the comic book—a period in our history most associated with the Marcos regime.

The issue of Martial Law has haunted the younger Marcos and his political ambition. He has refused to issue a public apology for his father’s dictatorship despite pressure from the public and political opponents.

 

Photo credit: Facebook

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