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Jun 3, 2015
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Rizal High School (RHS) has been recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest secondary school in the world in terms of student count—until 2005, when India's City Montessori School recorded roughly 30,000 students to RHS' 20K.

But beneath that impressive feat lies the sad truth of how overcrowded our schools are and how underdeveloped our local education system is. Despite the reported lion's share allocation of the national budget for the education sector, the crisis in the academe is still mirrored by overworked yet underpaid teachers, lack of classrooms and facilities, and the supposed deteriorating quality of education.

ANC's recent report on RHS' opening day sheds light on the local public schools' pressing issues every new school year. FHM looks at the figures presented in the report to remind you that the 12 in "K to 12" isn't the only stat we should turn our attention to when it comes to our suffering education system. We hope this will serve as a loud wake-up call for the government and its officials!


The initial number of student admissions when RHS opened school year 2015-2016. Students reportedly waited in line for almost half an hour before they were assembled for the flag ceremony.


The expected final number of the students by enrollment's end. With the influx of late enrollees and transferees, school officials wouldn't be surprised if this stat exceeds the 10K mark.


The Department of Education's ideal number of students per classroom. Which most of the time isn't even adhered to.


The RHS' standard student count per classroom. School officers are expecting this number to even reach 60 as the school year goes on, no thanks to late enrollment. And to think classrooms aren't getting any bigger.


The number of weeks it takes a regular RHS teacher to memorize all of his or her students' names. Imagine if Filipino instructor Mrs. Angeo handles five classes of 56 pupils, that would be...never mind.


The number of additional classrooms at the start of this school year. We're pretty sure those are barely enough for the new enrollees.


The number of additional classrooms expected to be finished before next school year, which are to be funded by the local government (68) and DepEd (40). We hope that this is a sign of (positive) things to come.


Watch the full report here:


Video via ABS-CBN News

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