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Mar 21, 2016
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Broadcaster Teddy Locsin Jr., who is known for his tough-talking ways particularly on social media platform Twitter, earned the ire of netizens after he dissed the Filipino language during the second PiliPinas 2016 Debate.

Locsin who referred to the Filipino language as “Tagalog” had pretty much nothing good to say after the language was used by the presidential candidates to make their points.

In response, the Tanggol Wika (Alyansa ng mga Tagapagtanggol ng Wika) group formed by netizens labeled Locsin as anti-Filipino and corrected him for his “Tagalog” reference of the Filipino Language.

“The language the presidentiables used is obviously Filipino—the national language as per the 1987 Constitution,” said the group.

Tanggol Wika also barraged Locsin with a number of points suggesting why using Filipino during a presidential debate was just appropriate.

“The presidential debates are official government activities as these are actually COMELEC-initiated; hence, the debates should really be in Filipino," they pointed out. "Filipino is the language of 99 percent of Filipinos (in contrast, as per official statistics, only less than 1 percent of households in the Philippines have English as their primary language).”

“Filipino is taught as a subject from elementary to college and recent NAT results point out to good scores for Filipino, in contrast with lower English scores; hence, using Filipino in any public debate is more practical and preferable.”

Tanggol Wika added that Locsin “should apologize to the masses for belittling and insulting the country's national language.”

According to the group, Locsin will learn a lot from the Filipino language if he starts “coming down from his ivory tower.”

“Teddy Boy will be awed by the depth of popular discussions in the national language in forums, community chats, assemblies, academic conferences, if he tries to learn his people’s language,” they added.

 

Photo credit: Politics.ph

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